Re-read / I Am David

i-am-davidI am David // by Anne Holm (1963)

This is the story of a boy who escapes a concentration camp and journeys through Europe in search of his long lost mother. As the book says, David is a strange child. He doesn’t understand the ways of living in freedom. He doesn’t know anything except the life of the concentration camp, and only what his friend and protector told him. But he a quick learner.

My favourite scenes are when he meets the family of Maria. It’s an exciting introduction as it involves a rescue from a burning building! And while I like Maria, the best part of this section, to my mind, involves Carlos. David actually meets up with Carlos earlier in the story, and it’s not a pretty meeting. So much so, David actually hates Carlos and compares him to them (i.e. the Soviet guards). David has such a fear of them (and rightly so!), that he cannot see any hope for Carlos. But this is the storyline where David grows the most.

I read this book for school when I was in the seventh grade. I don’t think I really understood it back then. Re-reading this book gave me a greater appreciation for this classic. One thing to note: Because it was written so many years ago (and also, originally, in Danish), the pace is slower than most modern books. [4.5 stars]


YOUR TURN…

Have you read this book? What are your thoughts? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments!

Note: I’m posting this for Greg Pattridge’s Marvelous Middle-Grade Monday

Review: The Vanderbeekers to the Rescue

vanderbeekers-rescueBook: The Vanderbeekers to the Rescue (2019)
Author: Karina Yan Glaser
Genre: MG, Contemporary
Rating: 3.5 stars

Basic plot: The excitement is great in the Vanderbeeker house. Mama has an interview and photoshoot for her home baking business. But disaster strikes when the inspector arrives at a time when only the kids are home. Needless to say, the inspection doesn’t go well and Mama is now in danger of losing her license. The kids are determined to make things better by scheduling a whole new inspection. Their goal is to pull this off without Mama and Papa ever suspecting a thing. But it isn’t helping that some mysterious person keeps leaving pets on the Vanderbeekers’ doorstep.

WHAT’S COOL…

1) I’ll say it again. I love, love, love this big family of five kids. Can I just say that I want a tree house like they build for Oliver? (Although, how they manage to do this in NYC confuses me. I didn’t even know from the previous books that they even had a backyard.)

2) I like how the kids all band together to try to solve this problem. Even when their opinions don’t always mesh, they work through it!

3) I’m glad Herman Huxley is back. At first, I didn’t think he’d make an appearance, but then good ole Herman Huxley pops into the story! I wish Glaser had brought him in a little more.

4) [Minor **Spoiler] The idea of a cat cafe is such fun for kids and animal-lovers. Yes, there really are such places as these. Not sure I’d really want to go, but I know a lot of people who have gone to cafes like this and raved about the experience. (I’m not really a cat person.) [End Spoiler]

5) There’s a nice little mystery involved over WHO is leaving all the animals at the Vanderbeekers’ house. It definitely had me trying to figure it out.

WHAT’S NOT COOL…

1) The violin recital. What was the purpose of this? I’m not sure. It didn’t seem to add to the story. (Nor did it take anything away. It just seemed not all that necessary.)

2) The grown-up in me wanted to cringe at times. Especially with the inspector-business! The realism wasn’t quite there, but kids will probably enjoy it.

3) We need MORE Herman Huxley!

FINAL THOUGHTS

My rating is 3.5 Stars (out of 5) – A fun book. Like I mentioned, I wasn’t keen on the fact that I didn’t find the whole premise to be super-realistic. But, kids probably won’t notice and will enjoy the freedom these children have as they run all over New York City!


YOUR TURN…

Have you read this book? What are your thoughts? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments!

Note: I’m posting this for Greg Pattridge’s Marvelous Middle-Grade Monday

Re-read: The Ramona Books – Part 2

Part 2 of Ramona Week! In honour of Beverly Cleary’s 104th birthday…

(Read Part 1 here.)


Ramona and Her Mother (1979)

ramona-motherRamona’s still in second grade. She’s having trouble because everybody says that Beezus is her mother’s girl. Isn’t Ramona her mother’s girl as well? This is the book where Ramona and Howie use the bluing, where Beezus gets her forty-year-old haircut, and Ramona decides to see what it’s like to be a firefighter and wear her clothes over her pajamas!

And to top it all, there’s the big crock-pot debacle which leads Beezus and Ramona to fear that their parents might be getting… a divorce! Eventually, Ramona learns that while her family might have problems, they still love each other.

One of my Favourite Quotes from the book*…
“All her life she had wanted to squeeze the toothpaste really squeeze it, not just one little squirt…The paste coiled and swirled and mounded in the washbasin. Ramona decorated the mound with toothpaste roses as if it was a toothpaste birthday cake.”

*I don’t think I’d ever have done this, but it does sound super-fun!! (And I don’t think I ever will do it. Too much waste! But it’s fun to read about. 🙂

My Burning Question about this book…
Where is Henry Huggins?! His parents are at the brunch in the opening chapter, but this is the place wherePOOF!he disappears from Ramona’s world.

My Rating: 4 stars


Ramona Quimby, Age 8 (1981)

ramona-q-age8This book holds a special place in my world. Firstly, it was my first introduction to the Ramona books. And secondly, I taught this book to my third-graders!

Not only is Ramona in third grade, but she’s now going to a new school and riding a big yellow bus. This book also introduces us to Yard Ape! But Ramona’s biggest challenge is… Willa Jean. I just love how she figures out how to use her sustained silent reading to thwart Willa Jean’s demands. (Like Ramona, I do prefer the term “sustained silent reading” to “DEAR”!)

This book really gets into Ramona’s head. She’s come a long way from being the pest from the early books. I love it how she’s growing up and we get to see that.

One of my Favourite Quotes from the book*…
“At last it was time for the egg. There were a number of ways of cracking eggs. The most popular, and the real reason for bringing an egg to school, was knocking the egg against one’s head. There were two ways of doing so, by a lot of timid little raps or by one big whack. Sara was a rapper. Ramona, like Yard Ape, was a whacker. She took a firm hold on her egg, waited until everyone at her table was watching, and ​whack​—she found herself with a handful of crumbled shell and something cool and slimy running down her face…”

*The best scene in the book! (Note: As I mentioned, I used to teach this book when I taught 3rd grade. One year, one of my students brought in hard-boiled eggs for Easter JUST SO WE COULD DO THIS! Yes, it’s fun to whack a hard-boiled egg on your forehead. There’s always that moment when you think… what if it’s really a raw egg?)

My Rating: 5 stars


Ramona Forever (1984)

ramona-foreverGuess who’s coming to visit? Howie’s Uncle Hobart! And on top of that, Ramona is sick and tired of being the one responsible for Willa Jean! This is the book where, finally, the sisters convince their parents to let them stay home alone after school. Of course, you know that’s not going to be easy.

There’s also big news with regards to their Aunt Beatrice. Yes, she’s getting married! And then, their mother announces that she’s [SPOILER!] pregnant. [End Spoiler]. A lot of changes for Ramona as she finished up the third grade.

One of my Favourite Quotes from the book*…
“’He’s Howie’s father’s little brother, only now he’s big,’ explained Ramona.

‘Why, that must be Hobart Kemp,’ said Aunt Beatrice. “He was in my class in high school.’ … ‘All the girls said he was cute…. He used to chew licorice and spit on the grass to make the principal think he was chewing tobacco like a professional baseball player…’

‘Where’s this cute licorice-chewing uncle coming from, and how did he get so rich?’
asked Ramona’s father, beginning to be interested. ‘Playing baseball?’

‘He’s coming from—’ Ramona frowned. ‘I can’t remember the name, but it sounds like
a fairy tale and has camels.’ Narnia? Never-never-land? No, those names weren’t right.

‘Saudi Arabia,’ said Beezus, who also went to the Kemps’ after school. Being in junior high school, she could take her time getting there.

‘Yes, that’s it!’ Ramona wished she had remembered first.”

*I love this dialogue exchange between the family. Including Aunt Beatrice! We don’t actually often SEE Aunt Beatrice in the books until now.

My Burning Question about this book…
Where is Yard Ape?! (Hint: Don’t worry too much, he comes back in the next book…)

My Rating: 3 stars


Ramona’s World (1999)

ramona-worldThis is the final book in the series! There’s a new girl in the fourth grade and her name is  Daisy. Soon enough, Daisy and Ramona become best friends. Ramona is starting to notice boys (ahem! Daisy’s older brother!) and she gets her first chance to babysit… well, catsit. And best of all, Yard Ape (aka Danny) is back in the story. And so is Susan of the boing-boing curls! And Ramona is happy being Baby Roberta’s big sister…

This book really is the perfect end to the series. It brings pretty much every loose end of the series together. The only missing person? Henry Huggins. Whatever happened to him? (Please Beverly Cleary, just ONE MORE book?! Fifth Grade Ramona!)

One of my Favourite Quotes from the book*…
“’Weren’t you wearing trousers?’ [asked Beezus.]

Ramona said in her most dignified way, ‘Princesses don’t wear trousers.’ She paused and added, ‘Unless they are in disguise.’

The family found this funny. Beezus recovered enough to say, “You must have looked weird, just your bare legs hanging down from the ceiling.’

And my underpants, thought Ramona in horror, not having pictured the scene from below until this moment. Did I fall far enough for them to show? What if Jeremy saw them? She could never face him again.”

*Best scene in the book is when she falls through the ceiling!

My Rating: 4.5 stars


YOUR TURN…

Have you read these books? What are your thoughts? Which one(s) do you like? Let me know your thoughts in the comments!

Re-read: The Ramona Books – Part 1

So… Yesterday (apparently) was Beverly Cleary’s 104th birthday. And so to celebrate this truly awesome writer, I’m going to do some mini-reviews on one of her most memorable characters: Ramona Quimby!

Beezus and Ramona (1955)

beezus-ramonaWe are first introduced to little Ramona Quimby through the books about Henry Huggins. In some ways, this book almost fits in better with that series, but for some reason, it’s considered Book 1 of the Ramona books, even if it’s not from Ramona’s POV! (It focuses on the point of view of Beezus.) And like in the Henry Huggins books, Ramona is… well, she’s a pest!

Ramona ruins a library book! She locks the dog Ribsy in the bathroom! She takes a bite out of every apple in the storage. Poor Beezus. But still, it’s fun to see Beezus figure out various ways to handle that pesky Ramona.

One of my Favourite Quotes from the book*…
“’Mother, what am I going to do?’ Beezus demanded. ‘It’s checked out on my card and I’m responsible. They won’t let me take any more books out of the library, and I won’t have anything to read, and it will all be Ramona’s fault. She’s always spoiling my fun and it isn’t fair!’ Beezus didn’t know what she would do without her library card. She couldn’t get along without library books. She just couldn’t, that was all.”

*I 100% get where Beezus is coming from! The horror of having to turn in a ruined library book. :/

My Rating: 3 stars


Ramona the Pest (1968)

ramona-pestRamona Quimby is in kindergarten! This (in my opinion) is truly Ramona’s first book. We get to see the magic of her thought process… like when she sits patiently because her teacher told her to “wait for the present” (thinking she was going to get a gift of some sort on the first day of school). We also get to see Henry Huggins in action (poor Henry) as the crossing guard who has to rescue Ramona from the mud.

And finally, there are those oh-so-tempting curls belonging to Susan (i.e. Ramona’s nemesis). Those curls are Ramona’s downfall. Just one little tug… BOING! Ramona gets sent home. Oh, the devastation! Convinced her beloved teacher hates her, Ramona refuses to go back to school. Will Ramona Quimby a school drop out at age 5?!

One of my Favourite Quotes from the book*…
“Ramona could not understand why grown-ups always talked about how quickly children grew up. Ramona thought growing up was the slowest thing there was, slower even than waiting for Christmas to come. She had been waiting years just to get to kindergarten, and the last half hour was the slowest part of all.”

*I think this quote best demonstrates why Cleary’s books remain as good today as when she wrote them. She understands what it’s like to be a child!

My Rating: 3 stars


Ramona the Brave (1975)

ramona-braveRamona isn’t afraid of anything… Especially not the first grade! And what’s really exciting is that the Quimby family is building onto their house so that Ramona gets her own bedroom. But she soon finds out that maybe she isn’t quite as brave as she thought when she has to sleep in that new bedroom… alone. And then there’s the dog on the way to school…

One of my Favourite Quotes from the book*…
“Ramona stood inside her new closet, pretending she was in an elevator. She slid open the door and stepped out into her new room, which she pretended was on the tenth floor.”

*I loved doing this as a kid. We lived in various houses and not all of our houses had this style of closet door. But when my sister and I got to share a bedroom with one of these “elevator” doors, you bet we took the elevator!

My Burning Question about this book…
Mrs. Kemp (i.e. Howie’s grandmother) babysits Ramona and Beezus when Mr. and Mrs. Quimby go to Parents’ Night at school. So, WHO is babysitting Howie and Willa Jean?

My Rating: 4 stars


Ramona and Her Father (1977)

ramona-father

This is probably my favourite of the books!

Mr. Quimby loses his job, and Ramona (who is now in second grade) wants to help out… If only she can get a job like those “rich” kids who do commercials on television. She and Beezus also team up to try to get their dad to stop smoking.

And then there’s the church Christmas pageant! Ramona has the perfect idea to dress up as a little lamb, but her mother never gets around to making the right kind of costume. It’ll take a little encouragement for Ramona to bounce back.

One of my Favourite Scenes in the book…
Ramona wants so much to help her dad earn a million dollars like the kids do on TV. She finds burrs and decides to practice by making a crown, just like in the commercial. Of course, once the burrs hit her hair, oh boy! Now it’s up to Dad to cut it out with scissors. But Ramona is bound and determined never to let him know the TRUE reason why she put the burrs in her hair in the first place!

My Rating: 5 stars


YOUR TURN…

Have you read these books? What are your thoughts? Which one(s) do you like? Let me know your thoughts in the comments!

Note: I’m posting this for Greg Pattridge’s Marvelous Middle-Grade Monday

Review: The Vanderbeekers and the Hidden Garden

Book: The Vanderbeekers and the Hidden Garden (2018)
Author: Karina Yan Glaser
Genre: MG, Contemporary
Rating: 4 stars

vanderbeeker-hidden-gardenBasic plot: The Vanderbeekers are back. But this time, while Isa’s away at music camp, her siblings are bored. That is until Mr. Jeet ends up in the hospital. Now the kids want to do something and they latch onto making a community garden in a nearby empty lot. But the horrible Herman Huxley is always there hanging around, and his dad is stirring up lots of trouble…

WHAT’S COOL…

1) I love, love, love the big family of five kids… although, it’s kind of only four kids since Isa’s away for most of the book.

2) I was so happy to see their relationship with Mr. Beiderman (from the first book in the series) has grown! Yay! And I really like how he’s part of the solution to their problem with the garden.

3) Herman Huxley! This character (I don’t remember him from the first book) was one of the best parts of this book. I like how he’s introduced as being the essence of everything the Vanderbeeker kids can’t stand. And how he’s connected to Mr. Huxley who’s even worse trouble when it comes to the garden. [**Minor Spoiler] I like how he bonds with Hyacinth over knitting! [end Spoiler]

4) Another part I liked had to do with Jessie’s dream to go to science camp. Oliver figures this out, about halfway through the book. What I really liked was her sacrifice; and how that sacrifice comes back to bless her. (Thanks to Oliver!)

5) I enjoyed all the references to books like The Secret Garden and Mandy. And all the bits about gardening. One of the more memorable scenes for me is when the friend offers the Vanderbeekers the bagged soil that’s sitting around her apartment. I knew that wasn’t going to end well!

WHAT’S NOT COOL…

1) The cover of the book makes it seem like the story is set in the autumn. It’s not. It’s set in summer (June and July). Don’t ask me why the leaves have already turned orange.

FINAL THOUGHTS

My rating is 4 Stars (out of 5) – A good sequel to the first Vanderbeeker book. This is definitely a quieter book than most. If you enjoy stories about big groups of siblings (like the Penderwicks), then this book is for you.


YOUR TURN…

Have you read this book? What are your thoughts? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments!

Note: I’m posting this for Greg Pattridge’s Marvelous Middle-Grade Monday

Review: Birdie

BirdieBook: Birdie (2019)
Author: Eileen Spinelli
Genre: MG, Contemporary
Rating: 5 Stars

Basic plot: Birdie and her mom are living with Birdie’s grandmother Maymee after the death of Birdie’s dad. But suddenly, love birds are everywhere: Maymee, her mom, and even her best friends. Birdie is having all sorts of trouble, yet when she embraces some of this change, she finds that maybe it’s not as bad as she feared.

WHAT’S COOL…

1) I loved Birdie! I loved her voice, her character arc, everything about this book.

2) Birdie’s Maymee is adorable. At first, she’s obsessed with dying (picking out her coffin and all that). But then, that all turns around when a certain somebody shows up in town. I love how this whole Romeo and Juliet scene happens in church as the pastor is reading from the Bible. Everything halts and the “chapter” ends with: “Pastor Carey smiles. ‘May I resume the reading now?'”

3) I like the themes of this book… of loss and death and even the changing relationships of friends. We have the love stories of the grown-ups mirroring those of the young middle-schoolers. Spinelli weaves all this together.

4) The resolution with the relationship between Birdie and Officer Downey was particularly poignant. I love how she goes from completely rejecting him to the scene at the cemetery.

5) The cover is adorable.

WHAT’S NOT COOL…

1) Nada.

FINAL THOUGHTS

My rating is 5 Stars (out of 5) – I absolutely loved this book. I’m not always a fan of books written in poetry, but Eileen Spinelli (in addition to Sharon Creech) is one author where this works for me.


YOUR TURN…

Have you read this book? What are your thoughts? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments!

Note: I’m posting this for Greg Pattridge’s Marvelous Middle-Grade Monday

Review: Lucky Luna

lucky-luna.jpgBook: Lucky Luna (2018)
Author: Diana Lopez
Genre: MG, Contemporary
Rating: 4 Stars

Basic plot: When Luna plays a prank on her prima (cousin Claudia), she gets in big trouble. Not only does she have to face the consequences (of not being allowed to wear her favourite hats), but now Claudia is going to be attending school with Luna! Needless to say, Luna’s not happy about it, but she gets some wise advice from her abuela (drink plenty of water, Luna 😉 ) and that helps… a bit. But when the kids at school seem to be making fun of her prima, Luna decides that maybe she should stick up for Claudia.

WHAT’S COOL…

1) Luna has a fun voice in this book. She’s so sure of herself, but she endears herself. What I think is really cool is Luna’s strip of white hair (due to poliosis). I have a childhood friend who has this same thing! (We always thought it was super cool.)

2) And I loved all her primas! What fun to have so many primas (cousins). It was great to see the connection even though there are age gaps. I love how they greet each other: “Prima!”

3) And then there’s Luna’s prima, Claudia. This is a classic relationship of sibling (prima?) rivalry. I like how the book works through their miscommunications. Both girls learn and grow.

4) One of my favourite parts was when Luna goes to visit her grandmother. Abuela has all these pithy sayings, except she says them in Spanish, but Luna only knows a little Spanish. So, she misses key things. (Like about drinking water!)

WHAT’S NOT COOL…

1) I wondered about the “no wearing hats” punishment fitting the crime of locking Claudia in the bathroom. Especially when the mom knows Luna’s a little self-conscious about her strip of white hair.

FINAL THOUGHTS

My rating is 4 Stars (out of 5) – What a fun read! I loved Luna and all her primas. And her abuela.


YOUR TURN…

Have you read this book? What are your thoughts? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments!

Note: I’m posting this for Greg Pattridge’s Marvelous Middle-Grade Monday

Review: Love Double Dutch

love-double-dutchBook: Love Double Dutch (2018)
Author: Doreen Spicer-Dannelly
Genre: MG, Contemporary
Rating: 3.5 Stars

Basic plot: Kayla can’t wait to go to the National Jump-off at Madison Square Garden with her Double Dutch team. But with her parents always fighting, she and her brother have to spend the summer in North Carolina while they work out their problems. That’s when Kayla joins up with her cousin to create their own Double Dutch squad. But they have some hefty competition. The cousin’s ex-best friends…

WHAT’S COOL…

1) Kayla is Brooklyn-cool! Yep. She’s definitely got attitude. But in a good way. I used to teach girls like her, so it brought back good memories of some of my students. 🙂

2) The Double Dutch stuff was very interesting. I remember jumping rope when I was a kid, but we never really did Double Dutch. This book made me want to go to youtube to watch a few videos of the competitions. And wow! Pretty amazing stuff.

3) I liked how Kayla’s confidence just pushes her team forward. They’re the outcasts, but the girls work really hard to get where they need to be.

4) The story has a happy ending, which I always love. I enjoyed the friendship developed by Kayla and Sally and Melissa and Tina. I was definitely rooting for them.

WHAT’S NOT COOL…

1) The realism was a little lacking for me. At times, I kept saying… “Really? I’m not so sure that would happen.” Especially with rope-jumping novices like Melissa and Tina. Especially when nerves play a really big part in competitions like this.

FINAL THOUGHTS

My rating is 3.5 Stars (out of 5) – A fun story about kids who skip rope competitively. The book has some great messages about cooperation and working together. A good summertime read.


YOUR TURN…

Have you read this book? What are your thoughts? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments!

Note: I’m posting this for Greg Pattridge’s Marvelous Middle-Grade Monday

Review: The Benefits of Being an Octopus

benefits-of-being-octopusBook: The Benefits of Being an Octopus (2018)
Author: Ann Braden
Genre: MG, Contemporary
Rating: 4 Stars

Basic Plot: Zoey has a lot of responsibility. She has to take care of her younger siblings while her mom’s at work. They are living with her mom’s boyfriend who’s so neat and tidy, and it’s up to Zoey to keep the little kids out of his hair. Zoey’s goal in life is to be invisible. But Zoey begins to see things that might just force her to speak up. Not just for herself, but for those she deeply cares about.

WHAT’S COOL…

1) I liked that Zoey was so responsible for her younger siblings. And they had such a nice relationship!

2) I enjoyed all the little details about octopuses. (Although, it doesn’t really figure into the resolution of the story. Wish it did.)

3) Matt and Silas were some of my favourite minor characters. Matt actually has a bit of an arc, and I wish we could have seen a tiny bit more of that. The silence of Silas intrigued me, but as a minor character, it wasn’t fully examined.

4) Fuchsia was a complex character. A little over-dramatic for me, but she played nicely into the story. I liked how her story and Zoey’s story are on parallel lines that then converge near the end. Nicely done!

5) Debates are NOT my favourite topic… I did not like them when I was a kid and I don’t really care for them now. That said, I did think this part of the book was fairly well done. When it came to the gun debate, I appreciated that both sides of the issue were shown.

6) I liked the teacher. But I like books that have teachers like her in them. 🙂

7) I love the cover of this book. I think I could look at it all day!

WHAT’S NOT COOL…

1) I didn’t like the fact that there were no good fathers in this story. At all. Zoey’s family has three fathers (hers, the middle kids’ father, and the baby’s father). And they’re all such jerks. I guess Silas’s father is okay, but he’s such a peripheral father (we never meet him). I wish Frank (Lenny’s father) could have been the one to stand up and give his son a talking to. (*SPOILER) Or at least help Zoey and her family with the get-away. (End Spoiler) Oh, and the solution at the end of the story? Truthfully, I don’t see that working for very long.

2) I’m not sure I really connected with Zoey. I didn’t dislike her, but I didn’t really love her either.

3) (*SPOILER) One thing I don’t get about the bullets that were fired at the school. If they were fired from a truck in the parking lot, wouldn’t somebody have noticed the breaking of the glass and the truck eventually speeding away? Something like, we’re looking for a white pickup?? (End Spoiler)

4) Zoey keeps mentioning in the book about how strong her mom is (until Lenny starts putting her down). And yet, I didn’t really see that in the back story. All I know is that the mom has a lousy taste in boyfriends. And that she can’t seem to be the adult in her own life.

FINAL THOUGHTS

My rating is 4 Stars (out of 5) – Overall, I really liked that this book dealt with some hard topics. I didn’t quite love it as much as I’d hoped, but I’d still recommend it.


YOUR TURN…

Have you read this book? What are your thoughts? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments!

Newbery Verdict: Ramona and her Father

Ramona and her Father // by Beverly Cleary (1977)

ramona-and-her-fatherNewbery Honor Book (1978)
Genre: Lower MG, Contemporary
Rating: 5 Stars

Basic Plot: Ramona’s in second grade when her father suddenly loses his job. When she finds out they have to scrimp and save, Ramona starts coming up with her own ideas to help her family make some money. One of her ideas ends with her hair in snarls. Another of her ideas is aimed at getting her father to quit smoking.

MY THOUGHTS…

I love, love, love this book. I love the relationship that is shown between Ramona and her dad. This book deals with some tough issues like having a father who is out of work. And the depression he goes through. And then there’s the “no smoking” campaign headed up by Ramona and her sister Beezus. One of my favourite scenes is when Ramona comes home to a house to find that her dad has broken his promise. The moment where Mr. Quimby talks to Ramona about what happened is heart-breakingly precious.

As with most middle-grade books, this one has a happy ending. And I’m glad it does. I adore the Christmas scene at the end.

NEWBERY VERDICT…

One of the best of the best Ramona Quimby books there is. It’s easy to see why it was nominated for a Newbery. It didn’t win, but there was tough competition that year. (The winner was Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson.) Still, this is a 5-star book for me!

YOUR TURN…

Have you read this book? What are your thoughts? Let me know in the comments!


Newbery Verdict Reading Challenge: This is a personal challenge for me to read books that have either won the Newbery Medal, or are a Newbery Honor book. The Newbery is named for eighteenth-century British bookseller John Newbery. Since 1922, this annual award has given to the author of the “most distinguished contribution to American literature for children.” A Newbery Honor book is given to the runners-up.

Note: I’m posting this for Greg Pattridge’s Marvelous Middle-Grade Monday