Halloweensie Contest

Another writing contest… This one is for Halloween and is put on by Susanna Hill. The rules for this one are: 1) stories must be 100 words or less; and 2) stories must include the words potion, cobweb, and trick.

My story is called “Not That House” and comes in at just 99 words. (Note: The photo below is mine. I took this photo back in 2016 and thought it evoked the house in the story.)


20161117ma_4791

NOT THAT HOUSE

by Maria Antonia

Word Count: 99

See that house? Let’s never going there for trick or treat.

A witch lives there.

See the cobwebs? That means she has spiders for pets. And rats, too, I’ll bet.

I just know she spends all day making potions in a deep, dark cauldron. Even if we can’t see her. That’s ‘cause she likes to walk around… invisible.

Wait! What are you doing? Don’t press that—

Ding dong.

“Why, Amanda Barnes! What a nice surprise.”

“Oh! Hi, Mrs. Webster.”

“Aren’t you and your little friend adorable. Here. Take some nice tasty treats.”

“Um, thanks.”

“See you in class tomorrow!”

THE END

A Story for Fall

This is a short story I wrote for the Kidlit Fall Writing Frenzy contest. Entitled “Road Trip” (200 words), this story is the result of my interpretation of the photo prompt below. (Note: The photo was provided by the contest. Therefore, not my photo!)

I decided to format the story as a conversation, almost as if it were recorded or overheard. So, there are no dialogue tags and no action lines.


Contest-writing

ROAD TRIP

by Maria Antonia

Word Count: 200

“I don’t know why we’re even going this year.”

“I promised your dad I’d bring you. We can still enjoy the fall colors without him, you know.”

“Oh look, an orange leaf, Grandma! And another one. I’m just soooo surprised.”

“Very funny, Sophie. No need for sarcasm.”

“It’s a free country. Isn’t that why Dad left in the first place? So we can have a stupid free country—”

“Sophie!”

Silence.

“I know you miss him, Soph.”

“Don’t call me that. Nobody calls me that except—”

“I miss him, too. But, he is coming back.”

“When?! He never tells me when. What kind of lousy parent leaves, then— Why are you stopping the car? This is Old Man Worthington’s land. If he catches us, he’ll… you know.”

“Mr. Worthington is harmless.”

“Hello? He lives in a spooky house. Next thing, he’ll come around that bend and—”

“Suit yourself.”

“Wait, you can’t leave me here. That’s abandonment.”

“Then, come. I need to stretch my legs.”

“See! It’s him. Old Man Worthington. Over there!”

“That’s not—”

“Get back in the car, Grandma, or else…”

Silence.

“Daddy?”

Crunch. Crunch. Crunch.

“Daddy, but you’re supposed to be in—”

“Hiya, Soph.”

THE END